Tag Archives: Home

252 E Ann Arbor Trail

15 Apr

252EAnnArborTrl

252 E Ann Arbor Trail was built in 1926. This was the home of very well respected teacher here in Plymouth that had a school name after her. This was once the home of Helen L. Farrand. Helen was born here in Plymouth on November 20, 1892 to William and Anna (Rocker) Farrand. Her father William ordered this “Kit Home” from Montgomery Ward. This Wardway home was built by William Farrand, he built this and other adjacent homes on E Ann Arbor Trail.

Helen was a graduate of Plymouth High School in 1911 and received her teaching certification from the Ypsilanti Normal School (now Eastern Michigan University).  Helen was a teacher in local communities. During WWI she actually worked in the Detroit Post office and returned to teaching in 1923. In 1927 Farrand came to work for Plymouth Canton Community Schools (PCCS). She taught at Central Grade School, Starweather, & Edna Allen School. Helen retired from teaching in 1958, that same year the PCCS School Board voted to name a “new elementary school” after her. 1958 the new school built at 41400 Greenbriar Lane in Plymouth was dedicated and named after Helen L. Farrard. Go Farrand Foxes!

Helen Farrand passed away in April of 1977 and was laid to rest in Plymouth’s Riverside cemetery. Helen was well respected by the community and loved by many students. Her legacy continues to live on today as hundreds of students are educated each year in the Elementary school named in her honor.

HFarrand

Helen Farrand

 

217 Ann Street

15 Apr

217AnnSt

217 Ann Street was built in 1912 and was home to a very well-known Teacher and School Principal of Plymouth-Canton Community Schools (PCCS). Nellie E. Bird (Smith) was born on a farm in Salem Township on March 4th, 1882. After graduating from Ypsilanti High School, she received her teaching degree from Ypsilanti Normal School (now known as Eastern Michigan University) while she was employed by PCCS, she earned her Masters Degree from the University of Michigan. Mrs. Bird was married to Frederick Bird and they moved into this Plymouth home in 1917 with their 2 daughters. When the Birds moved to Plymouth, Mrs Bird became a 5th grade teacher at Central Grade School. Mr Bird passed away in 1922. In 1923 Mrs Bird became the Principal of Central Grade School which was located in the same building as Plymouth High School (today known as PARC) until 1950. Mrs. Bird also served as Principal of Starkweather School.  In 1950 the Plymouth-Canton School Board voted unanimously to name the “new Elementary school” being built on Sheldon Rd after Mrs. Bird. In 1951 the Nellie E. Bird Elementary School located at 220 Sheldon Road in Plymouth was dedicated. (Go Thunderbirds!)

Mrs. Bird loved to plant a large garden and her specialty was raspberries. Many of her students stated that visiting her home on Halloween was always a delight especially since she would know most kids’ names even while wearing costumes. “She could see right though those disguises no matter what the costume” said a former student. It was said that Mrs Bird was very efficient, the child always came first and she was very fair with children and teachers. ” Working with her was really a delight, she was very strong on the fundamentals of education” stated by Mrs Tanger who taught under her. Nellie Bird passed away in 1980 and was laid to rest in the Riverside Cemetery. Mrs Nellie Bird was definitely an asset to the Plymouth-Canton Community and her legacy will continue to live on as hundreds of students are educated at the school named in her honor year after year.

Below is a photo of Nellie Bird at the dedication of Bird Elementary School.

BirdDedication

NBird

BirdElementary

Bird Elementary at 220 Sheldon Rd

1090 N Holbrook

22 Jul

1090Holbrook

1090 N Holbrook Street, built circa 1850 on a stone foundation. This was once part of the Henry Holbrook estate which once was home to one of Plymouth’s earliest mills. The Greek Revival home next door (1142 Holbrook) was the main house on the property and this home was built to house other family members. It’s been said that this was once the home of one of Henry’s 3 daughters. In 1850 it was recorded that Henry’s estate was worth $16,500 which by today’s standard would be just over a half-million dollars. This home was remodeled in 1922 to the current appearance that you see today. After nearly 170 years, it’s awesome to see this home is still standing strong. The current owners are proud of it’s rich Plymouth history and have done a great job keeping this home preserved.

Note: If you look closely to the left of the photo, you can see the yellow exterior walls of the well-known “Holbrook House”.

689 N. Mill Street

4 Mar

689NMill

689 N. Mill Street at the South West corner of Mill & Liberty was built by Carl Heide in 1911. Carl Heide was born in 1868 and immigrated from Germany in 1883. Carl quickly became a significant thread of Plymouth’s History as a Floral entrepreneur.  Carl became personal friends with the well-known and prominent George Starkweather. The South East corner of Liberty and N Mill have been most known for being Heide’s Greenhouses but they were originally built and owned by George Starkweather  and were leased by Carl Heide. Having a successful floral business, Mr. Heide decided to build his home directly across the street from the greenhouses which he later purchased from Starkweather. At one time Heide’s Flowers was known for being Plymouth’s oldest continuously running business.  Carl Heide passed away in 1941 and was laid to rest in Plymouth’s Riverside Cemetery. In 1944 this home, the Greenhouses and Floral business were purchased by Reinhold Ruehr who continued running Heide’s Flowers.

Below is a photo of the Heide (Starkweather) Greenhouse built circa 1889. This Greenhouse was located across the street from where the house stands today. Carl Heide and George Starkweather are featured in the photo. Photo courtesy of Dan Sabo:

HeidiGreenhouse

Photo of Carl Heide courtesy of the Plymouth Historical Museum:

CarlHeidi

1107 W. Ann Arbor Trail

27 Jul

1107WAnnArborTrl

1107 W. Ann Arbor Trail. Built 1861. Originally the home of Cassius Kellogg, Son of Plymouth Pioneer John Kellogg. Much of the land that now makes up the City of Plymouth was once owned by the Kellogg Family. The “Village Green” which we know as Kellogg Park in Downtown Plymouth was actually donated to the City by the Kellogg Family. The site which this home sits on was also said to have been a ceremonial site for local Native Americans.

UPDATE: As of 10/14/2016 We are sad to report that this home was lost to “progress”. Although this home was in great shape and well cared for, it was sold to a contractor and razed in order to built 2 new homes in its place.

If you would like to help prevent additional lose of historic homes in Plymouth, we encourage you to follow the Plymouth Preservation Network on facebook and be informed about other homes which may be threatened or things you may be able to do to help.

865 Penniman Ave

27 Jan

865Penniman

865 Penniman. Built circa 1879, This was once home to the Harry Robinson Family. Mr Robinson once served as a past President of the Village of Plymouth. Harry was a local business man and an auctioneer. The home now serves as commercial property.

Historic photo taken circa 1900

HarryRobinson865PennAve

11685 Haggerty Rd

16 Jan

11685Haggerty

11685 Haggerty Rd. Built in 1911 was originally located on Main Street. This home served as the Manse (Parsonage) for the historic First Presbyterian Church located appropriately on Church Street. In 1937 this home was relocated to Church Street (on the Church’s property). By 1982 this home was no longer occupied, was in disrepair and was nearly considered for demolition until it was saved by Greg and Mary Ash who purchased it for $1.00 and had it moved to its current location. Of course Mr. & Mrs. Ash did a complete renovation of this home and it still stands as an attractive part of the Plymouth community. Special thanks to Bryce Ford who read about this one in Sam Hudson’s book “150th Anniversary History First Presbyterian Church” and brought it to our attention.