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615 N. Mill St

20 Feb

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615 N Mill St Built circa 1878. In 1873 John Christian Peterhans (Chris) purchased a plot of land from George Starkweather and built this home. This home was owned by his descendants until 1975. Below is the obituary from The Plymouth Mail (newspaper) that was published in November of 1915:

“The death of J.C. Peterhans, which occurred last Friday morning at the family home just northeast of the village, Plymouth, loses one of her well-known and most highly esteemed citizens, and another veteran of the Civil War has answered the last roll call. Mr. Peterhans was a man who was honest and upright in all his dealing and had a host of friends. The funeral was held from his late home, Monday afternoon at two o’clock, Rev Joseph Dutton conducting the services. There was a large attendance of neighbors and friends. The members of Eddy Post No. 231 attended the services in a body.

The floral offerings were many and beautiful. A large American flag was draped at the head of the casket, which was the regimental headquarters flag of the 16th Michigan Infantry, to which Mr Peterhans belonged. The flag was not a regimental flag that was carried on the march or on the field of battle, but a flag that floated over the commanding officer’s tent, when they were in camp. It is more than 50 years old and has been under fire on several occasions. At the close of the war the flag was presented to Lieutenant Charles Salter, who saved the flag from being captured at Gaines’ Mills, June 27, 1862. In 1892, Lieutenant Salter died and it was given to Major JW Jacklin for safe keeping. October 6, 1906, it was left with the late George C. Peterhans and since his death JC Peterhans has been its custodian.

The internment took place in Riverside Cemetery, G.A.R. taking part in the committal service at the grave.

John C. Peterhans was born in Plymouth, Michigan, February 9, 1840, and departed this life November 5, 1915. He was a twin brother of the late George C. Peterhans, who died March 17, 1911. Mr Peterhans had been in failing health for nearly two years, having been confined to his home for the past two months. He bore his suffering very patiently. He was a member of Eddy Post, No. 231, G.A.R. and during his sickness spoke very much of his comrades. At the age of nine years, Mr Peterhans moved with his parents to Cincinnati, Ohio, remaining there about one year. He then returned to Plymouth, where he lived most of his life, with the exceptions of a few years spent near Caro, Tuscola County. On September 8, 1861, he enlisted in Co. F, 16th Michigan Infantry for three years. On October 25, 1862, he was discharged on surgeon’s certificate disability, at Antietam, Maryland. On July 2, 1863, he married Hester A. Smith of Plymouth. To this union were born five children, two sons, George and William having died in infancy. He leaves to mourn their loss, besides his widow and three daughters, three brothers, Henry and Emanuel of Caro, and Charles E. of Mt Pleasant; two sisters Mrs. Christina Ingersoll of Caro, and Amelia Peterhans of Cleveland, Ohio, also several other relatives and a host of friends. “

~ Today we are happy to still be graced with the presence of his former home adding to the historic beauty of Plymouth’s Old Village. Although the home has a large, modern addition on the backside, the original structure is still very much intact and is also used for commercial purposes.

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John Christian Peterhans

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View of Mill Street (near Liberty St) looking South circa 1905

876 N. Mill Street

18 Oct

 

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876 N. Mill Street. Built Circa 1887 by George and Eva Streng who were German Immigrants. The Streng family were involved in the hospitality business here in Plymouth and owned the Hotel which used to be right next door (North side). In 1924 this home and the hotel next door were purchased by Frank Sambrone and stayed in the Sambrone family for several years. The Hotel Victor was later known as the Anderine Hotel, The Nelson Hotel and the Old village Inn. The hotel burned down in the 1980’s. This historic home is still standing strong and adds to the charm of old village. This home has most recently served as a multi-family home (3 apartments). We look forward to see this home continue to be a great part of our community.

710 N. Mill St

17 Mar

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710 N. Mill Street. Built circa 1843 by William Bradner.  Standing at the corner of Mill and Liberty Streets in Old Village, this historic 2-Story Greek revival home sits on a Field stone foundation and retains much of its original dimensions and appears much like it did over 170 years ago. This home has seen a number of owners through the years including once being owned (in 1856)by Peter Gayde who was responsible for establishing the German Lutheran Church on Spring Street and also was a long time business owner whose original store structure still stands on Liberty. Peter went on to build a larger home at 761 Starkweather Street in 1875 which also still stands today. This home was recently remodeled and is being used for commercial purposes. Prior to being an attorney’s office it actually served as an Italian bistro. This is another great piece of Plymouth history that has survived for many years and will hopefully contribute to Plymouth’s historic ambience for several more years to come.

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1087 N Mill Street

21 Oct

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1087 N Mill Street. Built in 1852 as a Toll House for the Plymouth Plank Road. In 1850 a group came together and commissioned the construction of the Plymouth Plank road to connect this area directly to Detroit. The location here in Plymouth was Toll Gate #4. The Toll gate keeper actually lived in this home with his family. The original structure was a square and the addition to the left was added years later. In 1872 it was voted to “close down” the Plank Road and it simply became what we know today as Plymouth Road. This toll house originally stood at the corner of Plymouth Rd and Mill Street. In 1951 this home was purchased by the Clinansmith family who relocated it just North to 1087 N Mill Street near Wilcox Rd. Today this home is still inhabited by a member of the Clinansmith family who is proud of its unique history.

585 N. Mill Street

4 Oct

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Built in 1856 as the First Baptist Church now serves as St Michael Melkite Catholic Church. The First Baptist Church moved it’s parish to 45000 North Territorial Rd. In 1905, Carrie Nation a radical member of the temperance movement lectured at this church.

Photo of Carrie Nation. Inscription reads:

“Carrey A Nation Home Defender”

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845 N. Mill Street

29 Nov

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845 N. Mill St. Built in 1897 by George W. Springer. George had built an addition to the back of this Queen Anne style home and it was the workshop where he made cigars and supplied them to local hotels. George manufactured cigars with names like “Hotel Victor”, Hotel Plymouth”, and “The Mail”. George also served as the Plymouth Village Sheriff. George passed away in 1941 and wife Helen continued to live here well into the 1950s. When Helen passed in 1957 she joined George at Plymouth’s Riverside cemetery.

873 N. Mill Street

27 Jun

 

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873 N. Mill St. Built in 1913, this home was ordered through Sears Roebuck & Co. by Frank Pierce. Frank was the manager of the Plymouth United Savings bank branch located on Liberty St. In 1918 Frank’s Grandson Russell Kirk was born here in his home. Russell Kirk was an Author, Historian, & Literary Critic who is known as the father of modern-day conservatism. In his book “The Sword of Imagination” Russel describes growing up in Plymouth and how it impacted his way of thinking.

Below is a photo of Russell Kirk with President Reagan.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russell_Kirk